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Residency program at AIR/HMC, Budapest, Hungary in 2014
The residency is an opportunity for artists, designers, theorists, writers and curators to undertake a period of focused work at the HMC.

___Session 1: Wednesday May 14, 2014 - Friday, June 6, 2014            Deadline: January 28, 2014
___Session 2: Wednesday, June 11, 2014 - Friday, July 4, 2014            Deadline: April 5, 2014
___Session 3: Wednesday, July 09, 2014 - Friday, August 1, 2014         Deadline: April 5, 2014
___Session 4: Tuesday, August 5, 2014 - Friday August 29, 2014          Deadline: April 5, 2014
___Session 5: Friday, December 26 - Sunday, January 11, 2014            Deadline: August 11, 2014

Further Information please contact us at bszechy@yahoo.com

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Opportunities for artists.  Open call for book artists!
Library Thoughts 4 Exhibition
Deadline: March 31, 2014
This year at Hegyvidek Gallery will open the Library Thoughts 4 exhibition.  The exhibition curator Beata Szechy.
The exhibition scheduled from August 26 to September 6, 2014.
This exhibition is part of the AIR/HMC, Budapest, International Artists in Residency program.

For more info, application form write to:
bszechy@yahoo.com

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Muzsikás Story (Muzsikás történet)
(documentary, video, 116 min.)
March 1, 2014 at 2:30pm!
Center for Community Cooperation,2900 Live Oak Street, Dallas, TX
Director: Péter Pál Tóth

The 35 Years of Muzsikás Group
The Muzsikás Group earned its world fame: they play folk music to the highest standard, remaining true to their roots while also being open to other genres.  Even more importantly, they preserve and mediate their elemental love for music to their audience.  During the Kádár regime they were possibly the most famous and definitely the most lasting representatives of the then emerged folk "dance house movement" that was bold enough to make a statement about national identity, a taboo in those times.  After the change of the political system they shared the treasure that they and other similar-minded people have preserved - and basically salvaged - with the world.  They work together with classical, jazz, rock and klezmer musicians.

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